WooThemes refocuses on WordPress

7 Comments

WooThemes Refocuses

WooThemes announced on their blog that they are wrapping up their affair with non-WordPress themes. The Woo team has spent about a year developing themes for Expression Engine, Tumblr, Magento, and Drupal.

Support and documentation for the themes will remain available. EE, Drupal and Magento themes will still be for sale on ThemeForest, but by independent developers. Their Tumblr themes will be entirely discontinued and they “hope to release most of them / some of them on WP (powered by WooTumblog) in the near future.”

Adii said more about the decision and why they made it in the post:

All-in-all, this decision is not as much about the other platforms that we were pushing before, but instead our renewed focus on the core of our business. Our motivation behind this decision is therefore a simple re-alignment to our greatest passion and to further re-inforce our roots.

Their roots being WordPress, of course.

To me, it appears Woo is refocusing their method for integration and diversification rather than scaling back. Rather than being horizontally integrated across the theme industry, it appears they are moving toward more vertical integration within the WordPress platform. I say this largely due to the ever-pending WooCommerce add-on and the rumors of WooHosting.

So what do you think? Would you say it’s safe to put all your eggs in the WordPress basket? I guess it’s obvious we do. 🙂

7 thoughts on “WooThemes refocuses on WordPress

  1. I think it sounds nice on paper, but it’s tough saying if a pure vertical structure is the answer (especially with this hosting stuff). Either way, they seem to have the right people and being profitable shouldn’t be an issue whichever direction they choose.

    Regarding going all in; Warren Buffet went against the whole “modern portfolio theory” and said himself; put all your eggs in one basket, you just have to watch the basket carefully 🙂 I’m sure Woo is achieving a higher profit margin on WP then Drupal or other ‘less popular’ platforms, just common sense to start migrating.

    Good luck to them!

    PS: Wouldn’t mind seeing a response from Woo on this guys bashing post; http://foliovision.com/2011/03/28/paid-wordpress-themes-woo-vs-elegantthemes . Some unwarranted comments there.

      • Hi KJ,

        I don’t doubt the results (and think you’ve written up a great summary post), just find it ridiculous for someone to be so condescending towards other developers. Sure, the themes aren’t perfect, but there’s no reason to call them “really crappy” (see related post from same author). Commercial themes will always be heavier than a bespoke solution which is customized to fit your needs, and there will always be issues & bugs that need to be addressed. Just don’t think someone needs to patronize a product that is essentially dirt cheap. To be honest, it seems as if the author set that tone just to flip the article into some linkbait, or he’s just a hater (or both).

        Cheers

        Noel

        • Forgot to mention, feel free to tweet me if you’d like to add any of my themes to the list, have no problem with some transparency (though themes & frameworks are different things).

          • Hi Noel,

            Good point about Themes and Frameworks, I’ll make separate tables for each.

            Well done on the efficient coding of your Theme, which goes to show that even graphically rich WordPress Themes, can be coded to perform as well (and your case better) then some vanilla plain Frameworks.

            See results here: http://tpap.net/fDN4YX

  2. I think I read before that WordPress is installed and running more than 200 million web sites. I don’t know if that’s true or not, but there’s no denying the fact that WordPress has a much broader base of sites than all the “other” systems Woo was developing themes for. If Woo made $2M last year on themes and support, I’d have to guess less than 10% of that revenue was “non-wordpress” themes.

  3. VERY happy to hear this. WooThemes makes the VERY best wordpress themes (and I’ve tried a lot of them…), so I’m glad to see them focusing on their strengths.

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