Jetpack plugin upgrades to include Grunion Contact Form

20 Comments

Yesterday saw the release of version 1.3 of Jetpack, the plugin (which itself is a bundle of plugins) from Automattic. Keeping pace with their practice of adding a new enhancement every couple of versions, 1.3 adds a new contact form feature to the bunch.[ref]I’m happy to say it didn’t automatically activate for me because I’m using the (aptly named) Manual Control for Jetpack plugin.[/ref]

Now called “Contact Forms”, the experience is what you would have had using WordPress.com’s contact forms or the Grunion Contact Form plugin they released last year. The 1.3 update included a couple of small bug fixes, but really this update is all about Jetpack gobbling up another of Automattic’s plugins into Jetpack.

Perhaps more interesting than the update, however, is what Michael Adams confirmed in the update post:

In no particular order, here are a few of the things we’re adding or improving in Jetpack:

  • The commenting features currently available on WordPress.com,
  • Increased customizability of the Subscription feature’s emails, and
  • A better Jetpack management interface.

Nothing like few things to look forward to, right?

20 thoughts on “Jetpack plugin upgrades to include Grunion Contact Form

  1. I noticed the little contact form icon yesterday, and figured this is what had happened. Then I made sure all the unwanted modules were deactivated. Thanks for the heads up on Manual Control! The image and description by Mark Jaquith are really great too.

  2. The commenting features of WordPress.com will be the first Jetpack module I actually get excited about. I tried the Grunion forms in a client site and had trouble configuring new fields, but it could be the crappy theme they were running.

    The fact that two plugins (thanks, Mark) have to be run to prevent Jetpack from running amuck is asinine. Jetpack needs to get its act together. Automattic is not WordPress by any means, but they should represent the best the community has to offer, and their bad behavior in this plugin is sickening. Between the auto-activating, the high priority menu level, the crazy graphics all over the place, and the forced connection to .com for all modules even when you don’t need .com for some modules… it’s just ridiculous.

    • Completely agree, Brian!

      You should add to your list:
      The privacy issues, as it is not recommended to use that thing within the European Union, as it is phoning home with at least their stats module (an no one knows what goes where…).
      Plus: the translations files issues: they package incomplete and mixed-up translations into the plugin from their translate.wordpress.org platform. Take for example the German files where formal/informal is totally mixed up and lot of strings are missing. This is not a plugin that should be promoted like it, for international users it’s a no-go anyway!

      Automattic should stop promoting this thing as most users only need one or two features from the feedback I get from clients and from the community.

      Akismet has the same privacy issues – at least for EU countries – and should NOT be packaged with WordPress anymore!

    • The problems that Jetpack are trying to solve and the things we have planned for it’s future success are relatively new in our space. We’re learning and iterating as we go, too.

      We’re aware of how Jetpack comes on pretty strong in those areas, and we have dedicated resources going into improving these exact experiences in future versions. Thanks a ton for the feedback, and know that we do care and are listening. 🙂

      • Thanks for responding. I’m glad to hear that things are changing. Hopefully the user experience will indeed get better.

        While you’re listening, I’ll give you a real world example of how the connection to .com prevented me from being able to use the plugin. I needed a twitter widget for a client (shocking, I know). I wanted to use Jetpack’s because I was already going to use Jetpack for .com stats and I figure it will be kept up-to-date for the long haul. However, in my dev environment, I couldn’t connect the site to .com because I keep my sites password protected. So that meant that I could not use Jetpack features in dev (which need config and styling) and had to find an alternative solution. That is annoying.

        • It’s equally as difficult for us to develop Jetpack itself. While it’s possible to use Jetpack on a local installation, the experience is clearly not the same as a live environment. Again, more kinks that will get worked out over time.

          And, I’m happy to help where I can. I’ll try to put up a post somewhere about using Jetpack on a local, and try to remember to ping you when it happens.

    • I’ve been thinking the same thing. Just didn’t want to go publicly slamming a company who are so great at releasing their source code.

      But yeah, it’s really not a plugin I’m keen to see stay around. The collection of little Automattic plugins were terrific before. Now they are all disappearing 🙁

  3. Worth noting that while Grunion was last updated last year, it was released well before that. Looks like it was added to the directory a good four years ago.

  4. I think JetPack is the best thing that happened to websites hosted on WordPress. I am still waiting for the WordPress to release the visitor map feature for the dashboard.

  5. Hi,
    Does anyone here know how I can get Jetpack to send me an email once someone uses the form? I’ve got it setup and I can’t get it to send me an email. It shows up in the feedback, but I don’t want to be checking it everyday, needlessly. How can I configure this?
    Thanks!

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