Where WordPress download numbers really come from

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Photo credit: Ryan Imel

Photo credit: Ryan Imel

I fancy talking about WordPress download numbers. I do it a lot. But why not, right? With a growing user base and more and more people using WordPress every release, it’s fun to see those numbers go up.

But nearly every time I bring up download counts someone asks about what exactly is counted. Does it count dashboard upgrades? How about Fantastico or cPanel upgrades? I didn’t know, so I reached out to the WordPress.org folks to find out more.

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Automattic launches Enterprise: $500/month for unlimited bandwidth

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WordPress.com VIP screenshot

WordPress.com Enterprise, announced on the WordPress.com VIP blog, combines the two aspects of WordPress.com hosting that we’re familiar with: the paid upgrades of WordPress.com with the vetted plugin selection (70 count) and support of WordPress.com VIP. Enterprise is now available for $500 per site per month.

To put that $500 per month in perspective, WordPress.com upgrades (domain name, space upgrade, custom design, etc.) comes it at $99/year and WordPress.com VIP starts at $3,750/month. Enterprise, like WordPress.com upgrades, will cover just one site at a time, while VIP will cover up to five websites.

The Enterprise option does limit users to 70 approved plugins, so full control of sites shouldn’t be expected.

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WP Late Night #31: “Redefining next day shipping” with Nacin and Helen Hou-Sandi

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WP Late Night episode #31

Tonight’s WP Late Night saw special guests Andy Nacin and Helen Hou-Sandi. They each played an integral role in the extremely-recently-released WordPress 3.5, and we all discussed the new version for a solid hour. Listener beware: this one does get pretty heavily into developer topics.

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Or you can grab the show in a few other ways:

Full show notes are available just after the jump!

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Miss links already? Add them back with the Link Manager plugin

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The recently released WordPress 3.5 dropped the Link Manager from core — unless you were already using the feature, of course. For many this was met with cheers of “good riddance”, but that might not be you. The Link Manager was there for a reason, of course, and folks still used it.

If you find yourself wanting to use the link system in a new install of WordPress, or would like to bring it back on an upgraded install where it went away, try out WordPress Lead Developer Andrew Nacin’s Link Manager plugin. It’s available on WordPress.org and will add back the classic featured back to your install.

If you’re using the Link Manager and reading a WordPress blog like this one, I’d be curious to hear what you’re using it for exactly. Drop by in the comments below and let me know.

WP Late Night #30: “Insane in the Maintainn”

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Back from our Thanksgiving hiatus full of tryptophan and nonsense, the crew has its thirtieth episode in the can. Thirty. Episodes. Milestones are fun. So are italics.

First things first: big thanks to Robert Nienhuis, one of the organizers of WordCamp Orange County, for putting together the new, awesome WP Late Night logo. You can expect to see it showing up in a few more places real soon.

In this week’s episode we discussed the first release candidate of WordPress 3.5, WebDevStudios acquiring Startbox, WordPress maintenance services, and of course our bar tricks. Special guest Brian Richards also joined us for a few minutes to discuss Startbox and WebDevStudios.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Or you can grab the show in a few other ways:

Full show notes are available just after the jump!

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WordPress Theme Review Guidelines are being, well, reviewed

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The WordPress Theme Review Guidelines, in line with the upcoming release of WordPress 3.5, are under review and discussion by the Theme Review Team. Chip Bennett began the discussion on the Make WordPress Themes blog, where he explained the new version of WordPress will have little effect on themes aside from support for HiDPI screenshots.

Also up for discussion are new guidelines prohibiting themes from bundling custom content shortcodes, reduced criticality for content sidebar implementation in themes, and the importance of automatic feed links support in dot org themes.

A number of other items are brought up in the comments following Bennett’s post, and should be an interesting read for anyone who tries to stay on top of WordPress theme standards.

At the very least, the talk about prohibiting themes from bundling custom shortcodes sounds like a big step in the right direction — at least, I think I know of a few people who think so.

Now’s your chance for input: what would you like to see tweaked about the dot org theme review guidelines?

WP Late Night #29: “You fork, I’ll spoon”

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WP Late Night is back in full swing tonight with Brad, Dre and Ryan discussing the news of the week and the big WordPress events of the month. If you’ve been wondering about Pressnomics, John O’Nolan’s Ghost project, or Jetpack Photon than this is the show for you.

Enjoy!

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Or you can grab the show in a few other ways:

Show notes are just after the jump!

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WP Late Night Special Edition: WordPress Community Summit 2012

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Very late in the evening after the WordPress Community Summit wrapped up (technically early morning, but you know what I mean) a group of five gathered around to discuss the event and what it means for the community. Myself, Brad and Dre, Brandon Dove and John Hawkins all discussed our thoughts on the first-ever community summit.

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Or you can grab the show in a few other ways:

No show notes this time around — it was much too late to have a laptop up keeping track of everything we discussed!

Jetpack’s Photon could end up being a pretty big deal

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Jetpack is nothing if not a fairly divisive plugin in the WordPress community. At this point I’m sure we’ve all had more than a couple of conversations about its positive features and its more frustrating ones. With Jetpack 2.0, though, the new Photon feature may prove to be one of the more impressive offerings of the bunch for users and developers.

Photon, when enabled, will filter through the site’s content and, if the images are local to the site, pass them off to WordPress.com and serve them via their content delivery network. So, for example, the post image above would be served from the following URL: http://i0.wp.com/original-image-url.png?resize=600.

For the average WordPress user, getting this going only takes them installing Jetpack and turning this feature on. I’m not familiar with every CDN service out there, but this sounds like the easiest free way anyone can serve up their images from a CDN. Less taxing on the site’s host, likely faster page loads, and all without the user needing to learn a lot about the service or the setup process.

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