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Jonathan Dingman interviewed Kevin Muldoon

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The interview focused on WPMods and its sale. In hindsight, Muldoon said:

Throughout the life of WP Mods I published an article every day – not one day was missed. Perhaps if I focused on longer more in-depth articles the site would have grown quicker. I would have liked to have spent more time developing plugins and themes for the community too.

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The lifespan of a feature, from trac ticket to core

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Eric Mann wanted to be able to click the WordPress toolbar and scroll to the top of the site, like he could on Google+. He describes the process of submitting a patch to core, the various revisions, and then seeing it in use on his own sites and on WordPress.com.

He also has good advice for those contributing code for the first time:

Not every patch you submit to Trac will make it in to WordPress core. Some changes affect too narrow an audience to belong in the core codebase. If someone claims “that’s plugin territory” it’s because they think the number of users will benefit is just too small to warrant rolling your change in with the core project. Don’t take this personally.

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Aaron Brazell (technosailor) on the WP Engine blog

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In the interview Brazell said something interesting about WordPress consulting prices:

As more and more big names jump on the WordPress bandwagon, ticket prices on consultant work is still giving people sticker shock. It’s less so that way than a year ago, but as WordPress implements more and more CMS features instead of Bloggy features, organizations are looking harder at WordPress for solutions. Professionals get to charge lots of money because they’re professionals and the perception that “cheap web dev labor” is still the way to go, is a mentality that we have to continue to combat.

Both this and the Gary Jones interview I linked earlier are worth a read, and not just because both said they read WPCandy.

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The “patronage model” for free software freelancers

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Boone Gorges explains his method for taking freelance work that also allows him to contribute his code back to the community:

To combat the conflict, so that I can contribute more, I’ve moved increasingly toward what I think of as a “patronage” model. Broadly, the idea is that clients fund the process of turning the custom-developed features (that they were already going to pay for) into something that can be contributed back to the free software community; in exchange, they get certain benefits, like prestige and publicity.

If you aren’t following Boone’s blog yet you really, really should.