Submit questions for the WordPress Core Team’s meetup

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Jane Wells has announced that it’s time again for the WordPress Core Team meetup, which is again being held in the lovely setting of Tybee Island, Georgia. Meetups are one of the few times where many (if not all) of the WordPress core developers can actually work in the same room. What’s also cool about this particular meetup is the group will be taking questions via this WordPress.org support forum thread and answering them via video for WordPress.tv. If there’s anything you’ve wanted to ask the core team, but haven’t had a chance to before, you can do so now.

The core team will also be using the #wptybee hashtag while at the meetup, so you can follow their progress on Twitter that way as well.

So spill it: what question(s) do you hope the WordPress Core Team will answer?

WordPress 3.3 RC3, hopefully the last, has been released

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You might have thought the release of 3.3 RC2 was the last before the final release this cycle. If you did you’d be wrong, since I bring you news of Release Candidate 3 announced over the weekend. Jane Wells handled the announcement, and let us know just how close we are to the final version of 3.3:

The third (and hopefully final!) release candidate for WordPress 3.3 is now available. Since RC2, we’ve done a handful of last-minute tweaks and bugfixes that we felt were necessary.

Our goal is to release version 3.3 early next week, so plugin and theme authors, this is your last pre-release chance to test your plugins and themes to find any compatibility issues before the final release.

If you want my guess, I’m predicting Tuesday or Wednesday. What’s your bet?

As uaual, if you’ve spotted a bug you can make it known in the Alpha/Beta section of the support forum or head on over to WordPress Trac and file the bug report there. You’re also reminded to check out the important things you’ll need to know, that are published on the development blog.

In case you missed it: Multisite support for VaultPress is official

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It’s been about three months since VaultPress previewed their new Multisite support, where they invited beta testers to come and help them test it out in the wild. We’re a bit late on this news, but there’s a good chance you might not have heard: a little while ago VaultPress announced that Multisite support had now been officially added to the plugin.

Krista Stevens pointed out within the announcement that each site would still require an individual subscription, with the cheapest option currently being $15 per month. VaultPress will still function as normal with your main site and backup the networks user table, plugins, and themes.

The (good) news swept round the internet and Twitter, although I do think a couple of people would have liked a different pricing structure. Donnacha Mac Gloinn mentioned it in the comments of the announcement post, where Pete Davis was on had with a reply:

[…] I agree with you that many companies would introduce some kind of sliding scale pricing with a product like this, and it’s something that we’ll probably look at too, but not yet: we’re focused on getting all the features built first.

Andrea Rennick does make an interesting point in a short post on WPMUTutorials.

Do you use VaultPress, and are you excited to see Multisite support as much as others are? Do you think they should have introduced a sliding scale pricing structure right from the start, or is it a smart move to get the functionality in place first?

WordPress 3.3 is really close; time for Release Candidate 2

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It was just 6 days ago that WordPress 3.3 RC1 was released. Since then there’s been a handful of bugs fixed—then some more—and a few small tweaks to polish up the overall interface. Now we’re looking at RC2, just 32 commits later. Andrew Nacin made the announcement, and had to say:

As the first release candidate was well-received, we think we’re really close to a final release. Primarily, we’ve ensured that new toolbar (the admin bar in 3.2) has a consistent appearance across all browsers, and the API for developers is now final. You can check our bug tracker for the complete list of changes.

So if you’re looking to get your plugins and themes ready for when WordPress 3.3 drops, you’ll find your fair share of information on the development blog. I’d suggest you check it out, at the very least, there’s some live code examples you might find handy in the future.

If you spot a bug, you know the drill. Simply head on over to the alpha/beta section of the support forum and report your findings. Unless you’re comfortable writing a reproducible bug report as Nacin points out, in which case you can write one out on WordPress Trac.

Are you prepped for the release of the new version yet?

The Jetpack plugin version 1.2 is all clear for take off

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It might have been a while in the making, but Jetpack 1.2 has finally landed. The biggest feature in the update is the addition email subscriptions which Scott Berkun calls a “surprisingly powerful feature” in the comments.

So the updated Jetpack plugin will allow anyone to subscribe to your blog posts via email through a sidebar widget. Each time a post is published, WordPress.com will send a notification to subscribers. The plugin will also allow for subscriptions to post comments, mirroring the functionality folks usually use Subscribe to Comments for.

Jetpack 1.2 brings a fair number of other features and enhancements as well:

  • Improved user interface for showing new and updated Jetpack features
  • Better support for other languages
  • Smarter and safer Jetpack upgrades
  • New shortcodes for VideoPress & Google Maps
  • Added LinkedIn and Google+ buttons to Sharing UI
  • Image Widget & RSS Links Widget

Alright, your turn. How did the 1.2 flight upgrade work out for you? Is there anything you’d like to see included in future versions of Jetpack?

WordCamp Salt Lake City videos are now showing up online

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Did you miss out on attending WordCamp Salt Lake City earlier on in the year, but still want to catch up with what you missed? In that case I have some good news for you.

Joesph Scott announced recently that videos taken from the event were now starting to appear on WordPress.tv for everyone to watch. While they’re not all up yet, they’re in the process of editing the last of them, so keep your eyes peeled on the feed for the rest of them as they show up.